MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT DRUGS,ADDICTS AND RECOVERY.

Home Forums Family & Friends Support Coping with Drug Addiction MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT DRUGS,ADDICTS AND RECOVERY.

  • This topic has 2 replies, 3 voices, and was last updated 9 years ago by Heidi Quist.
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  • #21531
    Brian Burgess
    Participant

    There are so many misconceptions about the drug addicts that i thought that i would write something on it. I have seen quite a few posts on the drug addict/recovering addict, and how people mistrust them.Well,I feel there are both honest people & dishonest people in this world whether they have a drug history or not. Drug addicts aren’t always bad people. No one is above addiction, some of the least likely people in life suffer from addiction. Addicts really can turn their life around, I have been on all ends of the spectrum in life and I am living proof that if there is a will there is a way IN ANY SITUATION. I went from being in every school group I could, every sport, good grades, had a job, and had a great life to being a meth addict. I have been clean for years now and I still get my drug history thrown in my face on a weekly basis, but I was part of a very small statistic of the ones that too turn their lives around. Anyways, if there is a misconception on this subject you’d like to add feel free, tell your story, just whatever!

    #21532
    Jodi L
    Participant

    I love your post Brian. Thank you for sharing your experience, strength and hope. It is from stories like this that I gain more strength in my sobriety.

    There is a huge stigma about addicts/alcoholics. Every day I go to work I drive through the core of my city and see what a life of addiction and no help has done to so many. I am a fortunate one, I have a home, a job, a family, friends. The only thing I lost was my ability to drive for 90 days. I have lost nothing else. I still have my family, friends, home and job. I also have had a huge amount of support in my recovery. Something that so many people never have.

    I was a “functioning” alcoholic. I work in a very diverse environment that is in the public eye and constantly under scrutiny one way or another. There is a very large amount of “heavy drinkers” and alcoholics in my workplace. This is often kept quiet because of the stigma. I did my daily duties in all aspects of my life, including maintaining my job. Those around me who were not aware of my alcoholism were shocked to hear that I left for a month for treatment. So many people did not know. Only family and close friends knew of what I did behind closed doors.

    I feel a sense of relief that a few more people know. They can look at me now and say what they want behind my back, but chances are – they know someone just like me, if they aren’t “one” themselves. I also feel a sense of pride knowing that I have maintained my sobriety for 4 months now and am able to talk openly about it “outside my comfort zone”.

    I can only hope one day that those people I pass by daily will get the help they so very much need. Everyone deserves a chance, no matter who they are or where they have come from.

    #21533
    Heidi Quist
    Keymaster

    Great thoughts Brian. Yes, I have had to deal with this as well and the longer I have been in recovery the more I really don’t care. My life and how I show up speaks for itself and if people still have their thoughts and opinions about me due to my disease that is on them. I finally figured out I had no time to get stuck on other people’s thoughts or misconceptions of my disease of addiction. I started to realize those who judge me for the disease that I have really aren’t worth spending time with. Those who see me for who I am and see a recovered person who has walked through this hard disease and came back out on the other side and love me despite it all are the ones whom I choose to be around. As far as social media and the rest of the world…it’s hard and I have started to open up about my disease and recovery to hope that some day people can spread the word that it isn’t as horrible as it all sounds. Yes, I lied, cheated, stole and did horrible things in my disease but my living amends has shown that is not really who I am but it was my disease doing the living at the time. Thanks again for the topic I really enjoyed reading your post! Thanks to Jodi as well for adding great read!
    HQ

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