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The online assessments section contains short addiction self- assessment tools based on certified industry accepted standards and criteria. They provide a starting point for individuals who may be concerned that they have an issue with alcohol or drug addiction.

 

 

Welcome to the My Recovery Alcohol Addiction Evaluation

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The alcohol addiction screening self-evaluations provided on myRecovery.com are intended solely for educational purposes only and should not be understood to constitute any type of diagnosis or healthcare recommendation.

Alcohol Dependence Syndrome

The term “alcoholism” refers to a disease known as alcohol dependence syndrome, the most severe stage of a group of drinking problems which begins with binge drinking and alcohol abuse. Types of Alcohol Problem: Alcohol problems occur at different levels of severity, from mild and annoying to life-threatening. Although alcohol dependence (alcoholism) is the most severe stage, less severe drinking problems can also be dangerous.

Types of Alcohol Problems

  • Binge Drinking:

    Officially, binge drinking means having five or more drinks in one session for men and four or more for women. Another definition for binge drinking is simply drinking to get drunk. It is the most common drinking problem for young people, under age 21.

  • Alcohol Abuse:

    Binge drinking turns into alcohol abuse when someone’s drinking begins to cause problems and the drinking continues anyway. Alcohol abuse is when someone continues to drink in spite of continued social, interpersonal or legal difficulties. Alcohol abuse can result in missing time at school or work, neglecting child or household responsibilities or trouble with the law.

  • Alcohol Dependence:

    Alcohol abuse becomes alcohol dependence when drinkers begin to experience a craving for alcohol, a loss of control of their drinking, withdrawal symptoms when they are not drinking and an increased tolerance to alcohol so that they have to drink more to achieve the same effect. Alcohol dependence is a chronic and often progressive disease that includes a strong need to drink despite repeated problems.

Is Alcoholism Inherited? Alcoholism tends to run in families and a vast amount of scientific research indicates that genetics play a role in developing alcohol problems. But research also shows that a person’s environment and peer influences also impact the risk of becoming alcohol dependent.

Although a massive amount of scientific research indicates heredity plays some role in developing alcoholism, having a family history of alcoholism does not doom a person into becoming an alcoholic. The genetic tendencies can be overcome.

Definition of Addiction:

A chronic relapsing condition characterized by compulsive drug-seeking and abuse and by long-lasting chemical changes in the brain. Addiction is the same irrespective of whether the drug is alcohol, amphetamines, cocaine, heroin, marijuana, or nicotine.

Every addictive substance induces pleasant states or relieves distress. Continued use of the addictive substance induces adaptive changes in the brain that lead to tolerance, physical dependence, uncontrollable craving and, all too often, relapse

Dependence is at such a point that stopping is very difficult and causes severe physical and mental reactions from withdrawal. The risk of addiction is in part inherited. Genetic factors, for example, account for about 40% of the risk of alcoholism. The genetic factors predisposing to addiction are not yet fully understood.

Addiction and Dependence

Drug Addiction is a state of periodic or chronic intoxication produced by the repeated consumption of a drug (natural or synthetic). Its characteristics include: (i) an overpowering desire or need (compulsion) to continue taking the drug and to obtain it by any means; (ii) a tendency to increase the dose; (iii) a psychic (psychological) and generally a physical dependence on the effects of the drug; and (iv) detrimental effects on the individual and on society.

Drug habituation (habit) is a condition resulting from the repeated consumption of a drug. Its characteristics include (i) a desire (but not a compulsion) to continue taking the drug for the sense of improved well-being which it engenders; (ii) little or no tendency to increase the dose; (iii) some degree of psychic dependence on the effect of the drug, but absence of physical dependence and hence of an abstinence syndrome [withdrawal], and (iv) detrimental effects, if any, primarily on the individual.

Pseudo Addiction is a term which is used to describe patient behaviors that may occur when pain is undertreated. Patients with unrelieved pain may become focused on obtaining medications, may “clock watch,” and may otherwise seem inappropriately “drug seeking.” Even such behaviors as illicit drug use and deception can occur in the patient’s efforts to obtain relief.


Alcohol Abuse Screening Quiz

Answering these twenty questions will give you an idea if your drinking patterns are safe, risky or harmful.

The evaluation is confidential and anonymous; your results are not recorded; and are available only to you. You will not be asked for any personal ID information.

This quiz was developed by the Office of Health Care Programs, Johns Hopkins University Hospital. If you consume alcoholic beverages, this quiz can give you an idea how your drinking may fall into harmful patterns and indicate whether or not you have a drinking problem.

When answering the questions, use the last 12 months as a frame of reference.

Note: This quiz does not include alcohol use.

Drug Abuse Screening Quiz

Answering these twenty questions will help you decide whether you should seek help for drug abuse.

The evaluation confidential and anonymous; your results are not recorded; and are available only to you. You will not be asked for any personal ID information.

This quiz was adapted from the Vanderbilt University Addiction Center. After answering all the questions, you will receive a score which is a guide to the advisability of seeking treatment.

When answering the questions, use the last 12 months as a frame of reference. In the quiz, “drug abuse” refers to the use of prescribed or “over the counter” drugs in excess of the directions, the use of any illegal drugs or any non-medical use of drugs.

Note: This quiz does not include drug use.


Alcohol Abuse Screening Quiz


balanceAnswering these twenty questions will give you an idea if your drinking patterns are safe, risky or harmful.

The evaluation is confidential and anonymous; your results are not recorded; and are available only to you. You will not be asked for any personal ID information.

This quiz was developed by the Office of Health Care Programs, Johns Hopkins University Hospital. If you consume alcoholic beverages, this quiz can give you an idea how your drinking may fall into harmful patterns and indicate whether or not you have a drinking problem.

When answering the questions, use the last 12 months as a frame of reference.

Note: This quiz does not include alcohol use.


1.Do you lose time from work due to drinking?
2.Is drinking making your homelife unhappy?
3.Do you drink because you are shy with other people?
4.Is drinking affecting your reputation?
5.Have you ever felt remorse after drinking?
6.Have you had financial difficulties as a result of drinking?
7.Do you turn to inferior companions and environments when drinking?
8.Does your drinking make you careless of your family's welfare?
9.Has your ambition decreased since drinking?
10.Do you crave a drink at a definite time daily?
11.Do you want a drink the next morning?
12.Does drinking cause you to have difficulty in sleeping?
13.Has your efficiency decreased since drinking?
14.Is drinking jeopardizing your job or business?
15.Do you drink to escape from worries or trouble?
16.Do you drink alone?
17.Have you ever had a loss of memory as a result of drinking?
18.Has you physician ever treated you for drinking?
19.Do you drink to build up your self-confidence?
20.Have you ever been to a hospital or institution on account of drinking?


Drug Abuse Screening Quiz


balanceAnswering these twenty questions will help you decide whether you should seek help for drug abuse.

The evaluation confidential and anonymous; your results are not recorded; and are available only to you. You will not be asked for any personal ID information.

This quiz was adapted from the Vanderbilt University Addiction Center. After answering all the questions, you will receive a score which is a guide to the advisability of seeking treatment.

When answering the questions, use the last 12 months as a frame of reference. In the quiz, “drug abuse” refers to the use of prescribed or “over the counter” drugs in excess of the directions, the use of any illegal drugs or any non-medical use of drugs.

Note: This quiz does not include drug use.


1.Have you used drugs other than those required for medical reasons?
2.Have you abused prescription drugs?
3.Do you abuse more than one drug at a time?
4.Do you use drugs more than once a week?
5.Have you tried stop using drugs and were not able to do so?
6.Have you had blackouts or flashbacks as a result of drug use?
7.Do you ever feel bad or guilty about your drug use?
8.Does your spouse -or parents - ever complain about your involvement with drugs?
9.Has drug abuse created problems between you and your spouse or your parents?
10.Have you lost friends because of your use of drugs?
11.Have you neglected your family because of your use of drugs?
12.Have you been in trouble at work because of your use of drugs?
13.Have you lost a job because of drug abuse?
14.Have you gotten into fights when under the influence of drugs?
15.Have you engaged in illegal activities in order to obtain drugs?
16.Have you been arrested for possession of illegal drugs?
17.Have you ever experienced withdrawal symptoms (felt sick) when you stopped taking drugs?
18.Have you had medical problems as a result of your drug use - memory loss, hepatitis, convulsions, bleeding, etc.?
19.Have you gone to anyone for help for a drug problem?
20.Have you been involved in a treatment program especially related to drug use?

The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT)


balanceThe Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) was developed by the World Health Organization in 1982 as a simple way to screen and identify people who are at risk of developing alcohol problems.

The AUDIT test focuses on identifying the preliminary signs of hazardous drinking and mild dependence. It is used to detect alcohol problems experienced within the last year. It is one of the most accurate alcohol screening tests available, rated 92 percent effective in detecting hazardous or harmful drinking.

Unlike some alcohol screening tests, the AUDIT has proven to be accurate across all ethnic and gender groups.


The test contains 10 multiple choice questions on quantity and frequency of alcohol consumption, drinking behavior and alcohol-related problems or reactions. The answers are scored on a point system; a score of more than eight indicates an alcohol problem.

Please select the answer that most closely approximates the person being assessed. To correctly answer some of these questions you need to know the definition of a drink. For this test one drink is: One can of beer (12 oz or approximately 330 ml of 5% alcohol), or One glass of wine (5 oz or approximately 140 ml of 12% alcohol), or One shot of liquor (1.5 oz or approximately 40 ml of 40% alcohol).

1.How often do you have a drink containing alcohol?
2.How many drinks containing alcohol do you have on a typical day when you are drinking?
3.How often do you have six or more drinks on one occasion?
4.How often during the last year have you found that you were not able to stop drinking once you had started?
5.How often during the last year have you failed to do what was normally expected from you because of drinking?
6.How often during the last year have you been unable to remember what happened the night before because you had been drinking?
7.How often during the last year have you needed an alcoholic drink first thing in the morning to get yourself going after a night of heavy drinking?
8.How often during the last year have you had a feeling of guilt or remorse after drinking?
9.Have you or someone else been injured as a result of your drinking?
10.Has a relative, friend, doctor, or another health professional expressed concern about your drinking or suggested you cut down?

The Michigan Alcohol Screening Test (MAST), Revised


balanceThis 22-question self-test may help you become aware of your use or abuse of alcohol. This test specifically focuses on alcohol use, and not on the use of other drugs. A separate test called ‘DAST’ focuses on non-alcohol drugs.

Please read our disclaimer on psychological testing and our psychological testing privacy guarantee.


Completing this Psychological Screening Test

To take the questionnaire, please click the radio button next to the selection which best reflects how each statement applies to you. The questions refer to the past 12 months. Carefully read each statement and decide whether your answer is yes or no. Please give the best answer or the answer that is right most of the time.

1.Do you feel you are a normal drinker? ("normal" means drinking as much or less than most other people)?
2.Have you ever awakened the morning after some drinking the night before and found that you could not remember a part of the evening?
3.Does any near relative or close friend ever worry or complain about your drinking?
4.Can you stop drinking without difficulty after one or two drinks?
5.Do you ever feel guilty about your drinking?
6.Have you ever attended a meeting of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)?
7.Have you ever gotten into physical fights when drinking?
8.Has drinking ever created problems between you and a near relative or close friend?
9.Has any family member or close friend gone to anyone for help about your drinking?
10.Have you ever lost friends because of your drinking?
11.Have you ever gotten into trouble at work because of drinking?
12.Have you ever lost a job because of drinking?
13.Have you ever neglected your obligations, your family, or your work for two or more days in a row because you were drinking?
14.Do you drink before noon fairly often?
15.Have you ever been told you have liver trouble such as cirrhosis?
16.After heavy drinking have you ever had delirium tremens (D.T.'s), severe shaking, visual or auditory (hearing) hallucinations?
17.Have you ever gone to anyone for help about your drinking?
18.Have you ever been hospitalized because of drinking?
19.Has your drinking ever resulted in your being hospitalized in a psychiatric ward?
20.Have you ever gone to any doctor, social worker, clergyman or mental health clinic for help with any emotional problem in which drinking was part of the problem?
21.Have you been arrested more than once for driving under the influence of alcohol?
22.Have you ever been arrested, even for a few hours, because of other behavior while drinking?

The Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST)


balanceThis 20-question self-test may help you become aware of your use or abuse of drugs. This test specifically does not include alcohol use. Separate tests called ‘CAGE’ and ‘MAST’ focus on alcohol use. Please read our disclaimer on psychological testing and our psychological testing privacy guarantee.


Completing this Psychological Screening Test

To take the questionnaire, please click the radio button next to the selection which best reflects how each statement applies to you. The questions refer to the past 12 months. Carefully read each statement and decide whether your answer is yes or no. Please give the best answer or the answer that is right most of the time.

For the purposes of this screening test, drug abuse refers to:

  1. The use of prescribed or “over the counter” drugs in excess of the directions, and
  2. Any non-medical use of drugs

Remember, for the purposes of this screening test, the questions do not refer to alcoholic beverages. The DAST does not include alcohol use. Separate tests called ‘CAGE’ and ‘MAST’ focus on alcohol use.

Please check the one response to each item that best describes how you have felt over the past 12 months.

1.Have you used drugs other than those required for medical reasons?
2.Have you abused prescription drugs?
3.Do you abuse more than one drug at a time?
4.Can you get through the week without using drugs?
5.Are you always able to stop using drugs when you want to?
6.Have you had "blackouts" or "flashbacks" as a result of drug use?
7.Do you ever feel bad or guilty about your drug use?
8.Does your spouse (or parents) ever complain about your involvement with drugs?
9.Has drug abuse created problems between you and your spouse or your parents?
10.Have you lost friends because of your use of drugs?
11.Have you neglected your family because of your use of drugs?
12.Have you been in trouble at work because of your use of drugs?
13.Have you lost a job because of drug abuse?
14.Have you gotten into fights when under the influence of drugs?
15.Have you engaged in illegal activities in order to obtain drugs?
16.Have you been arrested for possession of illegal drugs?
17.Have you ever experienced withdrawal symptoms (felt sick) when you stopped taking drugs?
18.Have you had medical problems as a result of your drug use (e.g., memory loss, hepatitis, convulsions, bleeding, etc.)?
19.Have you gone to anyone for help for a drug problem?
20.Have you been involved in a treatment program especially related to drug use?

The FAST Alcohol Screening Test Designed to Detect Hazardous Drinking


balanceThe FAST alcohol screening test was developed specifically to be used in busy medical offices and emergency rooms to screen patients for hazardous drinking, although it has also been used effectively in the general population.

The AUDIT test, a longer screening test, has been an extremely effective screening tool for many years. But, it takes too long to administer and score in most busy physician offices and emergency rooms. The FAST test was developed by taking four key questions from the AUDIT test and arranging them into a short, two-phase test.

When compared to the full AUDIT test, the FAST test detects 93 percent of hazardous drinkers detected by the longer version.

Shortest Test Available

Unlike the CAGE test, the FAST test measures a person’s hazardous drinking in the past year. The CAGE test is designed to test alcohol dependency over a lifetime.

More than half of patients given the FAST test only have to answer the first question. Depending on the response to the first question of the test, the other questions may not be asked at all, making the FAST test potentially the shortest screening tool available today.


1.How often do you have eight or more drinks on one occasion?
2.How often during the last year have you been unable to remember what happened the night before because you had been drinking?
3.How often during the last year have you failed to do what was normally expected of you because of your drinking?
4.Has a relative or friend, a doctor or other health worker been concerned about your drinking or suggested you cut down?

The TWEAK Alcohol Screening Test Test Designed for Pregnant Women


balanceThe TWEAK alcohol screening test is a short, five-question test which was originally designed to screen pregnant women for harmful drinking habits. Researchers at the Research Institute on Addictions at Buffalo, New York, Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology and Wayne State University developed the TWEAK as a short test more sensitive to detecting alcohol problems in pregnant women.

Note: Any level of drinking during pregnancy can be harmful.

Their follow-up research revealed that the TWEAK test was more effective than the T-ACE test in diagnosing harmful drinking in women.

TWEAK has also been used to screen for harmful drinking in the general population, outpatients, hospital patients, and in emergency room settings.

The test is made up of three questions which appear on the CAGE test, plus two additional questions — one about the person’s tolerance to alcohol and another about blackouts.

The name of the test is an acronym for Tolerance, Worried, Eye-opener, Amnesia, and K/Cut down (with a poetic license use of “K” instead of “C” for cutting down on alcohol consumption).


1.How many drinks does it take to make you feel high?
2.Have close friends or relatives worried or complained about your drinking in the past year?
3.Do you sometimes take a drink in the morning when you first get up?
4.Has a friend or family member ever told you about things you said or did while you were drinking that you could not remember?
5.Do you sometimes feel the need to cut down on your drinking?

The CAGE Questionnaire A Screening Test for Alcohol Dependence


balanceThis simple 4-question self-test may help you become aware of your use or abuse of alcohol. This test specifically focuses on alcohol use, and not on the use of other drugs. A separate test called ‘DAST’ focuses on non-alcohol drugs. Please read our disclaimer on psychological testing and our psychological testing privacy guarantee.


Completing this Psychological Screening Test

To take the questionnaire, please click the radio button next to the selection which best reflects how each statement applies to you. The questions refer to your feelings and behavior over your whole life. Carefully read each statement and decide whether your answer is yes or no. Please give the best answer or the answer that is right most of the time.
Please check the one response to each item that best describes how you have felt and behaved over your whole life.

1.Have you ever felt you should cut down on your drinking?
2.Have people annoyed you by criticizing your drinking?
3.Have you ever felt bad or guilty about your drinking?
4.Have you ever had a drink first thing in the morning to steady your nerves or get rid of a hangover (eye-opener)?