Faith and spirituality calendar

EVENTS

Christmas show: Free performance featuring illusionist Brock Gill at 3 and 7 p.m. Dec. 10 at Edgewood Baptist Church, 20406 76th Ave. W., Edmonds. Free child care will be provided. 425-776-5104 or tlarson@ebc-edmonds.org

DivorceCare: 7 to 8:45 p.m. Mondays at First Covenant Church, 4502 Rucker Ave., Everett. Those going through divorce can find experience and healing at the weekly session. 425-252-9191 or bill.goodwin@1stcov-everett.org.

Food drive: First Church of Christ, Scientist is sponsoring a food drive for a local food bank from Nov. 24 to Dec. 19. Drop of donations at the church, 1718 Broadway, Everett, 425-252-9182.

Guitarist and singer Enrique Henao: 7 p.m. today at St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 21405 82nd Place W., Edmonds. Suggested donation $20. 425-778-0371.

Hymn singing: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. today at Immanuel Lutheran Church, 2521 Lombard Ave., Everett. 98201. Sing your favorite hymns. Refreshments will be served. 425-252-7038, ilce.office1@frontier.com or [URL]www.ImmanuelEverett.org;http://www.ImmanuelEverett.org[URL].

Pie social and singalong: 6 p.m. Sunday Trinity Lutheran Church, 2324 Lombard Ave., Everett. Pie, coffee or tea, and ice cream is $5 per person or $15 for a family. Whole pies to be auctioned off at the end of the evening. Proceeds go toward building repairs and a lift for wheelchair accessibility. 425-252-1239 or trinitylutheraneverett.com.

Pilgrims Christmas Concert: 6 p.m. Dec. 4 at Westminster Presbyterian church, 2531 Hoyt Ave., Everett. Sacred yuletide music and holiday tunes for all ages from a male chorus. Reception to follow. A free-will offering will be taken to support New Horizons Ministry. 425-252-3757.

Meetings, Services

Catholic Daughters of the Americas: St. Rita Court of Everett meets at 9:45 a.m. the third Saturday of the month at Washington Oakes Retirement Home. 1717 Rockefeller Ave., Everett.

Chabad of Snohomish County: 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Torah study with Rabbi Zevi Goldberg at the center, 22225 100th Ave. W., Edmonds. For services and other information, go to [/URL]www.jewishsnohomish.com;http://www.jewishsnohomish.com[URL] or call 425-967-3036.

Harvest Time Church’s temporary location: The Lynnwood church has moved to the Main Hall of the Everett Trade Building, 2810 Lombard Ave., Everett. Services are at 11 a.m. Sundays. [/URL]www. harvesttimechurch.org;http://www.harvesttimechurch.org[URL].

Hindu Temple and Cultural Center: Open from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. weekdays, and from 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. weekends. The temple is at 3818 212th St. SE, Bothell. [/URL]www.htccwa.org;http://www.htccwa.org or 425-483-7115.

Homeschooling support group: Home Oriented Meaningful Education meets at 7:15 p.m. on the second Tuesdays of the month at Parkridge Community Church, 3805 Maltby Road, Bothell. For more information, contact Heidi Curnutt at gardeniapassion@yahoo.com or go to [URL]www.HOME-Wa.org.

Independent Bible Study: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays at the Christian Science Reading Room, 1718 Broadway, Everett, 425-252-9182.

Living Interfaith Church: Services at 11 a.m. second and fourth Sundays of the month at Alderwood Middle School, 20000 28th Ave. W., Lynnwood. www.livinginterfaith.org.

Masjid Umar al-Farooq: Prayers, Islamic holiday celebrations and special events. 5507 238th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace. www.farooq masjid.org or 425-776-6162.

Mommy’s Day Out: A program for children 2 to 10 years old, to give moms time for themselves. 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. Registration fee is $50, $95 charge per month. To register, call 425-334-9422.

Our Lady of Guadalupe Home School Support Group: Meetings at 6:45 p.m. every fourth Sunday at the South Everett Neighborhood Center, 6315 Fleming St., Suite B, Everett. Members visit, pray the Rosary and discuss Catholic homeschooling. Tiffany Webb, 425-397-7249 or olog@yahoogroups.com.

Sikh Center of Seattle: Satsangs are held from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays at the center, 20412 Bothell-Everett Highway, Bothell. 425-487-4878 or www.sikhcenter ofseattle.org.

Support group for caregivers: Daytime group at 10 a.m. every first Thursday. Evening group at 6 p.m. the last Wednesday of every month. Both groups meet at Faith Lutheran Church, 6708 Cady Road, Everett. Prayer, brief Bible study and sharing with one another. 425-355-6005.

Free meals, clothes

Annie’s Community Kitchen: 5 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays at the Edmonds Lutheran Church, 23525 84th Avenue W., Edmonds. All are invited for food and fellowship.

Everett First Covenant Church community dinner: 5 to 7 p.m. the fourth Thursday of each month at 4502 Rucker Ave., Everett. 425-252-9191.

Sanctuary Care Ministries: Free clothing: 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Thursdays at Sanctuary Ministries church, 15533 75th St. NE, Lake Stevens. 360-386-9871.

Community dinner at Zion Lutheran Church: 6 to 7 p.m. Wednesdays at 4634 Alger Ave., Everett. 425-252-1429 or www.zionlutheranofeverett.com.

Dinner at the Bell: 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays; Everett First Presbyterian Church, 2936 Rockefeller Ave., Everett. 425-259-7139.

Community dinner at Northlake Christian Church: 6 p.m. second Thursday of each month at 19029 North Road, Bothell. 425-672-8044.

First Nazarene Church of Everett lunch: noon every Monday at 2502 Lombard Ave., Everett.

Free community lunch: Noon to 1 p.m. with social hour from 1 to 2 p.m. the fourth Thursday of each month. Faith Lutheran Church, 6708 Cady Road, Everett. 425-353-4758.

Dinner to feed the hungry: 6:30 p.m. Fridays at Praise Chapel, 604 Cascade Ave., Granite Falls. Saturday night jam sessions from 5 to 9 p.m. are drug- and alcohol-free events. 360-722-0636.

Food bank: 9:30 a.m. Sundays at Marysville Free Methodist Church, 6715 Grove St. All are welcome. Volunteers always needed. Bill, 360-657-3963.

Everett First Baptist Church Friday meal outreach: 5:15 p.m. every Friday at Everett First Baptist, 1616 Pacific Ave., Everett.

Free community dinner at The Table: 6 p.m. Thursdays, Mountain View Church, 9015 44th Drive NE, Marysville. Children welcome. 360-659-0445.

Free community supper: Loaves and Fishes from 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesdays at Sultan Community United Methodist Church, 212 Birch St., Sultan.

Interfaith Dinner Bell: 5:30 p.m. Thursdays at First Congregational United Church of Christ, 2624 Rockefeller Ave., Everett. 425-252-7224.

Salt of the Earth Food Bank: Soup kitchen at noon Tuesdays at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 2531 Hoyt Ave., Everett. Free sack lunches or hot meals are served to the homeless, low-income seniors and families, and kids on the streets. 425-355-1042.

Salvation Army of Everett fellowship meals: 5:15 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays. Recovery meetings, 6 p.m. Mondays. 2525 Rucker Ave., Everett. 425-259-8129.

Snohomish community kitchen at St. John’s: 4:30 to 6 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays. 913 Second Ave., Snohomish. 360-568-4622.

Valley Clothing: Open from 10 a.m. to noon and from 6 to 8 p.m. first and third Wednesdays of every month at 17146 Beaton Road SE, Monroe. 360-794-7749. Donations of new and gently used clothing accepted during open hours or by arrangement. SnoValleyClothing@yahoo.com.

Read more http://www.heraldnet.com/article/20111119/NEWS01/711199940/1004

Faith and spirituality calendar

EVENTS

Christmas show: Free performance featuring illusionist Brock Gill at 3 and 7 p.m. Dec. 10 at Edgewood Baptist Church, 20406 76th Ave. W., Edmonds. Free child care will be provided. 425-776-5104 or tlarson@ebc-edmonds.org

DivorceCare: 7 to 8:45 p.m. Mondays at First Covenant Church, 4502 Rucker Ave., Everett. Those going through divorce can find experience and healing at the weekly session. 425-252-9191 or bill.goodwin@1stcov-everett.org.

Food drive: First Church of Christ, Scientist is sponsoring a food drive for a local food bank from Nov. 24 to Dec. 19. Drop of donations at the church, 1718 Broadway, Everett, 425-252-9182.

Guitarist and singer Enrique Henao: 7 p.m. today at St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 21405 82nd Place W., Edmonds. Suggested donation $20. 425-778-0371.

Hymn singing: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. today at Immanuel Lutheran Church, 2521 Lombard Ave., Everett. 98201. Sing your favorite hymns. Refreshments will be served. 425-252-7038, ilce.office1@frontier.com or [URL]www.ImmanuelEverett.org;http://www.ImmanuelEverett.org[URL].

Pie social and singalong: 6 p.m. Sunday Trinity Lutheran Church, 2324 Lombard Ave., Everett. Pie, coffee or tea, and ice cream is $5 per person or $15 for a family. Whole pies to be auctioned off at the end of the evening. Proceeds go toward building repairs and a lift for wheelchair accessibility. 425-252-1239 or trinitylutheraneverett.com.

Pilgrims Christmas Concert: 6 p.m. Dec. 4 at Westminster Presbyterian church, 2531 Hoyt Ave., Everett. Sacred yuletide music and holiday tunes for all ages from a male chorus. Reception to follow. A free-will offering will be taken to support New Horizons Ministry. 425-252-3757.

Meetings, Services

Catholic Daughters of the Americas: St. Rita Court of Everett meets at 9:45 a.m. the third Saturday of the month at Washington Oakes Retirement Home. 1717 Rockefeller Ave., Everett.

Chabad of Snohomish County: 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Torah study with Rabbi Zevi Goldberg at the center, 22225 100th Ave. W., Edmonds. For services and other information, go to [/URL]www.jewishsnohomish.com;http://www.jewishsnohomish.com[URL] or call 425-967-3036.

Harvest Time Church’s temporary location: The Lynnwood church has moved to the Main Hall of the Everett Trade Building, 2810 Lombard Ave., Everett. Services are at 11 a.m. Sundays. [/URL]www. harvesttimechurch.org;http://www.harvesttimechurch.org[URL].

Hindu Temple and Cultural Center: Open from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. weekdays, and from 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. weekends. The temple is at 3818 212th St. SE, Bothell. [/URL]www.htccwa.org;http://www.htccwa.org or 425-483-7115.

Homeschooling support group: Home Oriented Meaningful Education meets at 7:15 p.m. on the second Tuesdays of the month at Parkridge Community Church, 3805 Maltby Road, Bothell. For more information, contact Heidi Curnutt at gardeniapassion@yahoo.com or go to [URL]www.HOME-Wa.org.

Independent Bible Study: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays at the Christian Science Reading Room, 1718 Broadway, Everett, 425-252-9182.

Living Interfaith Church: Services at 11 a.m. second and fourth Sundays of the month at Alderwood Middle School, 20000 28th Ave. W., Lynnwood. www.livinginterfaith.org.

Masjid Umar al-Farooq: Prayers, Islamic holiday celebrations and special events. 5507 238th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace. www.farooq masjid.org or 425-776-6162.

Mommy’s Day Out: A program for children 2 to 10 years old, to give moms time for themselves. 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. Registration fee is $50, $95 charge per month. To register, call 425-334-9422.

Our Lady of Guadalupe Home School Support Group: Meetings at 6:45 p.m. every fourth Sunday at the South Everett Neighborhood Center, 6315 Fleming St., Suite B, Everett. Members visit, pray the Rosary and discuss Catholic homeschooling. Tiffany Webb, 425-397-7249 or olog@yahoogroups.com.

Sikh Center of Seattle: Satsangs are held from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays at the center, 20412 Bothell-Everett Highway, Bothell. 425-487-4878 or www.sikhcenter ofseattle.org.

Support group for caregivers: Daytime group at 10 a.m. every first Thursday. Evening group at 6 p.m. the last Wednesday of every month. Both groups meet at Faith Lutheran Church, 6708 Cady Road, Everett. Prayer, brief Bible study and sharing with one another. 425-355-6005.

Free meals, clothes

Annie’s Community Kitchen: 5 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays at the Edmonds Lutheran Church, 23525 84th Avenue W., Edmonds. All are invited for food and fellowship.

Everett First Covenant Church community dinner: 5 to 7 p.m. the fourth Thursday of each month at 4502 Rucker Ave., Everett. 425-252-9191.

Sanctuary Care Ministries: Free clothing: 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Thursdays at Sanctuary Ministries church, 15533 75th St. NE, Lake Stevens. 360-386-9871.

Community dinner at Zion Lutheran Church: 6 to 7 p.m. Wednesdays at 4634 Alger Ave., Everett. 425-252-1429 or www.zionlutheranofeverett.com.

Dinner at the Bell: 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays; Everett First Presbyterian Church, 2936 Rockefeller Ave., Everett. 425-259-7139.

Community dinner at Northlake Christian Church: 6 p.m. second Thursday of each month at 19029 North Road, Bothell. 425-672-8044.

First Nazarene Church of Everett lunch: noon every Monday at 2502 Lombard Ave., Everett.

Free community lunch: Noon to 1 p.m. with social hour from 1 to 2 p.m. the fourth Thursday of each month. Faith Lutheran Church, 6708 Cady Road, Everett. 425-353-4758.

Dinner to feed the hungry: 6:30 p.m. Fridays at Praise Chapel, 604 Cascade Ave., Granite Falls. Saturday night jam sessions from 5 to 9 p.m. are drug- and alcohol-free events. 360-722-0636.

Food bank: 9:30 a.m. Sundays at Marysville Free Methodist Church, 6715 Grove St. All are welcome. Volunteers always needed. Bill, 360-657-3963.

Everett First Baptist Church Friday meal outreach: 5:15 p.m. every Friday at Everett First Baptist, 1616 Pacific Ave., Everett.

Free community dinner at The Table: 6 p.m. Thursdays, Mountain View Church, 9015 44th Drive NE, Marysville. Children welcome. 360-659-0445.

Free community supper: Loaves and Fishes from 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesdays at Sultan Community United Methodist Church, 212 Birch St., Sultan.

Interfaith Dinner Bell: 5:30 p.m. Thursdays at First Congregational United Church of Christ, 2624 Rockefeller Ave., Everett. 425-252-7224.

Salt of the Earth Food Bank: Soup kitchen at noon Tuesdays at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 2531 Hoyt Ave., Everett. Free sack lunches or hot meals are served to the homeless, low-income seniors and families, and kids on the streets. 425-355-1042.

Salvation Army of Everett fellowship meals: 5:15 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays. Recovery meetings, 6 p.m. Mondays. 2525 Rucker Ave., Everett. 425-259-8129.

Snohomish community kitchen at St. John’s: 4:30 to 6 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays. 913 Second Ave., Snohomish. 360-568-4622.

Valley Clothing: Open from 10 a.m. to noon and from 6 to 8 p.m. first and third Wednesdays of every month at 17146 Beaton Road SE, Monroe. 360-794-7749. Donations of new and gently used clothing accepted during open hours or by arrangement. SnoValleyClothing@yahoo.com.

Read more http://www.heraldnet.com/article/20111119/NEWS01/711199940/-1/NEWS01

SPIRITUALITY: Prisons, pies and perspective

Norris Burkes
Norris Burkes

SPIRITUALITY: Prisons, pies and perspective

More In Lifestyle

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Read more http://www.thestarpress.com/article/20111119/LIFESTYLE/111190337/1024/RSS04

Faith and spirituality calendar

EVENTS

Christmas show: Free performance featuring illusionist Brock Gill at 3 and 7 p.m. Dec. 10 at Edgewood Baptist Church, 20406 76th Ave. W., Edmonds. Free child care will be provided. 425-776-5104 or tlarson@ebc-edmonds.org

DivorceCare: 7 to 8:45 p.m. Mondays at First Covenant Church, 4502 Rucker Ave., Everett. Those going through divorce can find experience and healing at the weekly session. 425-252-9191 or bill.goodwin@1stcov-everett.org.

Food drive: First Church of Christ, Scientist is sponsoring a food drive for a local food bank from Nov. 24 to Dec. 19. Drop of donations at the church, 1718 Broadway, Everett, 425-252-9182.

Guitarist and singer Enrique Henao: 7 p.m. today at St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 21405 82nd Place W., Edmonds. Suggested donation $20. 425-778-0371.

Hymn singing: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. today at Immanuel Lutheran Church, 2521 Lombard Ave., Everett. 98201. Sing your favorite hymns. Refreshments will be served. 425-252-7038, ilce.office1@frontier.com or [URL]www.ImmanuelEverett.org;http://www.ImmanuelEverett.org[URL].

Pie social and singalong: 6 p.m. Sunday Trinity Lutheran Church, 2324 Lombard Ave., Everett. Pie, coffee or tea, and ice cream is $5 per person or $15 for a family. Whole pies to be auctioned off at the end of the evening. Proceeds go toward building repairs and a lift for wheelchair accessibility. 425-252-1239 or trinitylutheraneverett.com.

Pilgrims Christmas Concert: 6 p.m. Dec. 4 at Westminster Presbyterian church, 2531 Hoyt Ave., Everett. Sacred yuletide music and holiday tunes for all ages from a male chorus. Reception to follow. A free-will offering will be taken to support New Horizons Ministry. 425-252-3757.

Meetings, Services

Catholic Daughters of the Americas: St. Rita Court of Everett meets at 9:45 a.m. the third Saturday of the month at Washington Oakes Retirement Home. 1717 Rockefeller Ave., Everett.

Chabad of Snohomish County: 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Torah study with Rabbi Zevi Goldberg at the center, 22225 100th Ave. W., Edmonds. For services and other information, go to [/URL]www.jewishsnohomish.com;http://www.jewishsnohomish.com[URL] or call 425-967-3036.

Harvest Time Church’s temporary location: The Lynnwood church has moved to the Main Hall of the Everett Trade Building, 2810 Lombard Ave., Everett. Services are at 11 a.m. Sundays. [/URL]www. harvesttimechurch.org;http://www.harvesttimechurch.org[URL].

Hindu Temple and Cultural Center: Open from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. weekdays, and from 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. weekends. The temple is at 3818 212th St. SE, Bothell. [/URL]www.htccwa.org;http://www.htccwa.org or 425-483-7115.

Homeschooling support group: Home Oriented Meaningful Education meets at 7:15 p.m. on the second Tuesdays of the month at Parkridge Community Church, 3805 Maltby Road, Bothell. For more information, contact Heidi Curnutt at gardeniapassion@yahoo.com or go to [URL]www.HOME-Wa.org.

Independent Bible Study: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays at the Christian Science Reading Room, 1718 Broadway, Everett, 425-252-9182.

Living Interfaith Church: Services at 11 a.m. second and fourth Sundays of the month at Alderwood Middle School, 20000 28th Ave. W., Lynnwood. www.livinginterfaith.org.

Masjid Umar al-Farooq: Prayers, Islamic holiday celebrations and special events. 5507 238th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace. www.farooq masjid.org or 425-776-6162.

Mommy’s Day Out: A program for children 2 to 10 years old, to give moms time for themselves. 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. Registration fee is $50, $95 charge per month. To register, call 425-334-9422.

Our Lady of Guadalupe Home School Support Group: Meetings at 6:45 p.m. every fourth Sunday at the South Everett Neighborhood Center, 6315 Fleming St., Suite B, Everett. Members visit, pray the Rosary and discuss Catholic homeschooling. Tiffany Webb, 425-397-7249 or olog@yahoogroups.com.

Sikh Center of Seattle: Satsangs are held from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays at the center, 20412 Bothell-Everett Highway, Bothell. 425-487-4878 or www.sikhcenter ofseattle.org.

Support group for caregivers: Daytime group at 10 a.m. every first Thursday. Evening group at 6 p.m. the last Wednesday of every month. Both groups meet at Faith Lutheran Church, 6708 Cady Road, Everett. Prayer, brief Bible study and sharing with one another. 425-355-6005.

Free meals, clothes

Annie’s Community Kitchen: 5 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays at the Edmonds Lutheran Church, 23525 84th Avenue W., Edmonds. All are invited for food and fellowship.

Everett First Covenant Church community dinner: 5 to 7 p.m. the fourth Thursday of each month at 4502 Rucker Ave., Everett. 425-252-9191.

Sanctuary Care Ministries: Free clothing: 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Thursdays at Sanctuary Ministries church, 15533 75th St. NE, Lake Stevens. 360-386-9871.

Community dinner at Zion Lutheran Church: 6 to 7 p.m. Wednesdays at 4634 Alger Ave., Everett. 425-252-1429 or www.zionlutheranofeverett.com.

Dinner at the Bell: 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays; Everett First Presbyterian Church, 2936 Rockefeller Ave., Everett. 425-259-7139.

Community dinner at Northlake Christian Church: 6 p.m. second Thursday of each month at 19029 North Road, Bothell. 425-672-8044.

First Nazarene Church of Everett lunch: noon every Monday at 2502 Lombard Ave., Everett.

Free community lunch: Noon to 1 p.m. with social hour from 1 to 2 p.m. the fourth Thursday of each month. Faith Lutheran Church, 6708 Cady Road, Everett. 425-353-4758.

Dinner to feed the hungry: 6:30 p.m. Fridays at Praise Chapel, 604 Cascade Ave., Granite Falls. Saturday night jam sessions from 5 to 9 p.m. are drug- and alcohol-free events. 360-722-0636.

Food bank: 9:30 a.m. Sundays at Marysville Free Methodist Church, 6715 Grove St. All are welcome. Volunteers always needed. Bill, 360-657-3963.

Everett First Baptist Church Friday meal outreach: 5:15 p.m. every Friday at Everett First Baptist, 1616 Pacific Ave., Everett.

Free community dinner at The Table: 6 p.m. Thursdays, Mountain View Church, 9015 44th Drive NE, Marysville. Children welcome. 360-659-0445.

Free community supper: Loaves and Fishes from 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesdays at Sultan Community United Methodist Church, 212 Birch St., Sultan.

Interfaith Dinner Bell: 5:30 p.m. Thursdays at First Congregational United Church of Christ, 2624 Rockefeller Ave., Everett. 425-252-7224.

Salt of the Earth Food Bank: Soup kitchen at noon Tuesdays at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 2531 Hoyt Ave., Everett. Free sack lunches or hot meals are served to the homeless, low-income seniors and families, and kids on the streets. 425-355-1042.

Salvation Army of Everett fellowship meals: 5:15 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays. Recovery meetings, 6 p.m. Mondays. 2525 Rucker Ave., Everett. 425-259-8129.

Snohomish community kitchen at St. John’s: 4:30 to 6 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays. 913 Second Ave., Snohomish. 360-568-4622.

Valley Clothing: Open from 10 a.m. to noon and from 6 to 8 p.m. first and third Wednesdays of every month at 17146 Beaton Road SE, Monroe. 360-794-7749. Donations of new and gently used clothing accepted during open hours or by arrangement. SnoValleyClothing@yahoo.com.

Read more http://www.heraldnet.com/article/20111119/NEWS01/711199940/-1/news01

Spirituality: Prisons, pies and perspective

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Giving spirituality a try

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Published: 11/19/2011

BY DAVID YONKE
BLADE RELIGION EDITOR

Giving spirituality a try Jana Riess set lofty spiritual goals, but felt she came up short as she wrote her book. But weeks later she turned to what she learned. Enlarge

Jana Riess is no saint. But she gave it a try, and that’s the point of her new book, Flunking Sainthood: A Year of Breaking the Sabbath, Forgetting to Pray, and Still Loving My Neighbor (Paraclete Press, $16.99).

The concept was for Ms. Riess to read spiritual classics, then share her observations through her distinctive writing style combining wit, theological wisdom, and a sense of whimsy.

The author, who has a master of divinity degree from Princeton Theological Seminary and a doctorate in American religious history from Columbia University, lined up writings by such spiritual heavyweights as Brother Lawrence, St. Therese of Lisieux, Eugene Peterson, Abraham Joshua Heschel, and St. Benedict.

Before embarking on her literary journey, however, Ms. Riess decided that writing about reading is boring.

“I was excited about doing the project, but I thought it wouldn’t be interesting to write about reading. I needed some corresponding action,” she said in an interview this week. “I told the publisher, ‘Why don’t I try some of the spiritual practices related to the reading?’ ”

Ms. Riess, who lives in Cincinnati, mapped out 12 spiritual classics, one for each month, and selected specific practice to focus on, including prayer, fasting, keeping the sabbath, hospitality, and generosity.

She then embarked on a year-long quest to read the writings of the spiritual giants and put their lessons into practice.

While reading the “Desert Parents” — third-century monks and nuns who were among the first Christian hermits — on fasting, Ms. Riess abstained from eating from dawn to dark.

Although Ms. Riess faithfully kept the fast for 28 days, she said she never felt a spiritual breakthrough.

Instead, she said, she felt “rotten” for vainly hoping she’d lose weight, and admits to whining about being so tired and hungry that “I can’t even think about the faith-related reasons I’m supposed to be fasting.”

In June, Ms. Riess started out tackling “Centering Prayer,” a form of peaceful meditation as taught by Father Thomas Keating.

But after fumbling through the practice she switched to the Jesus Prayer, a simple 12-word petition that takes four seconds to recite: “Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner.”

Ms. Riess faithfully recited the Jesus Prayer 50 times a day, yet never achieved its goal of experiencing “perfect love.”

“What kind of loser fails at the Jesus Prayer?” she asked herself.

It was the same story each month: setting lofty spiritual goals, but falling short. But flunking sainthood is all about being human with the highs and lows and lessons learned.

Six weeks after turning in her manuscript, Ms. Riess was stunned by a phone call telling her that her father, whom she had not seen or heard from in 26 years, was dying in a hospital in Mobile, Ala.

He had left home, abandoning the family and leaving them penniless, when Ms. Riess was 14.

Visiting him in the emergency room, seeing him on life-support, Ms. Riess had to reach deep within — and found strength drawn from those spiritual exercises.

“All those unsuccessful practices, those attempts at sainthood that felt like dismal failures at the time, actually took hold somehow,” she said. “They helped to form me into the kind of person who could go to the bedside of someone who had harmed me and be able to say, ‘I forgive you, Dad. Go in peace.’ ”


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Manfred Lautenschlaeger Award for Publications on the Topic of God and Spirituality

18.11.2011 – (idw) Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg

Young researchers around the globe with outstanding dissertations or a published book on the topic of God and Spirituality will continue to receive support in the future. The Manfred Lautenschlaeger Award for Theological Promise will be given starting in 2013. The award, as before conferred by the Research Center for International and Interdisciplinary Theology (FIIT), will replace the former prize for work in this field, financed over the last years by the John Templeton Foundation. Press Release
Heidelberg, 18 November 2011

Manfred Lautenschlaeger Award for Publications on the Topic of God and Spirituality
Annual prize for 10 young researchers replaces previous award from John Templeton Foundation

Young researchers around the globe with outstanding dissertations or a published book on the topic of God and Spirituality will continue to receive support in the future. The Manfred Lautenschlaeger Award for Theological Promise will be given starting in 2013. The award, as before conferred by the Research Center for International and Interdisciplinary Theology (FIIT), will replace the former prize for work in this field, financed over the last years by the John Templeton Foundation. The Lautenschlaeger Award will be presented each year to ten young researchers throughout the world working in various disciplines such as theology, philosophy, religious studies, ethics and neighbouring fields.

The Lautenschlaeger Award is endowed with prize monies in the amount of $10,000 each. Doctoral dissertations or the first book published after receipt of the doctoral degree will be honoured. Each years recipients will also have the opportunity to organise two colloquia. These international, interdisciplinary events will each receive funding in the amount of 15,000. The colloquia are to be organised and led by at least two award recipients from different countries and disciplines. Dr. h.c. Manfred Lautenschläger, Honorary Senator of Heidelberg University and the awards benefactor, has the gratitude of FIIT Director, Prof. Dr. Dr. Michael Welker: We are extremely appreciative of the support of Manfred Lautenschläger, as it allows us to continue to advance committed and qualified researchers and their international and interdisciplinary collaboration.

The former prize, awarded from 2007 to 2011 and financed by the John Templeton Foundation, was presented every year in May at Heidelberg University in conjunction with a colloquium at the International Science Forum Heidelberg (IWH). The gathering offered the recipients, selected from all over the world, the opportunity to present their current projects and discuss them with other scholars. A total of 60 young researchers from 17 countries and of various religious affiliations and academic fields each received the $10,000 prize.

The Research Center for International and Interdisciplinary Theology, which was founded at Heidelberg University in 2005, is dedicated to interdisciplinary research of relevant theological and societal issues. It weaves together twelve areas of research, thirteen as of next year, led by Heidelberg researchers from theology and related disciplines.

Applications for the Manfred Lautenschlaeger Award for Theological Promise 2013 can be submitted until 31 May 2012. For details online, see http://www.fiit.uni-heidelberg.de/fiit.

Contact:
Prof. Dr. Dr. Michael Welker
Caroline Gödde (Office)
Department of Scientific Theology
phone: +49 6221 54-3356, mw@uni-hd.de

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Exploring Spirituality: An Interview with Paul Masvidal from Cynic

Julie Frish: How’s the tour so far?

Paul Masvidal: It’s good so far, still new. This is only the third stop in the tour so far. We have had plenty of days off.

JF: What influences your music, especially to create such a unique sound?

PM: I am kind-of all over the place musically. I always say I am a fan of great artists instead of calling it by genre.

JF: Who are some of your favorite artists?

PM: Probably a lot of folk artists like The Beatles, Bob Dylan and Neil Young. My mom turned me on to a lot of cool stuff. My older brother got me into classic rock like Pink Floyd. Those are my roots. But I got into jazz in college where I studied classical guitar. Thus, I got into classical music, I really enjoy ambience too. I am really all over the map, really modern, and in a way, pop too. Jazz to classical to world music.

JF: How was the transition from Death to your current, jazzier sound [with Cynic]?

PM: Death was a result of Chuck, the lead singer, who was almost like an older brother to us. He knew we were really into progressive music…so he brought us in to bring something new to it.

JF: Do you play any other instruments?

PM: I do some piano, a little of everything, but guitar is my main one.

JF: Why such a transition in Carbon-Based Anatomy from the first album, which has a much harder sound?

PM: It wasn’t intentional. I just try to stay true to a process. The creative process does itself, you just kind of show up and whatever happens. This is where I am now.

JF: If you weren’t doing music, what else would you do?

PM: I would probably paint or write or some other art form.

JF: Why do you use vocal processing?

PM: At first, I started using it for a couple reasons. At first, I didn’t just want to have a regular voice, I wanted to have something unique to it. At first I thought it was really cool, I thought it made me sound like an alien, kind-of like this trippy alien feature. I think I was also hiding behind it a little bit because I was insecure about my voice, so it made me discover who I was. Over time, it relates now because it’s futuristic and has an interesting aesthetic to the band. Now it’s part of it, a piece of the pie.

JF: You use the same artist, Robert Venosa, for all your album art. What is the story behind this?

PM: When I was 10, I had his postcards around my bed. When I signed a record deal when I was 18, they said you needed art for your cover. So I contacted his publisher and I thought he was just some fantasy dude from 100 years ago. They said you can contact him directly and I totally freaked out. He became this mentor for me, but he passed away his past year. It’s like our music is trying to sound like his art.

JF: Why did you choose Cynic as a name, especially with being so spiritual?

PM: Well, actually, the origin’s of “cynic” actually a misnomer. Cynic has gained a negative connotation over the years. The roots of cynic were from the ancient Greeks. Socrates and Plato and all these ancient guys said that happiness was not an external experience. The main [cynic] was Diogenes. He used to walk around broad daylight with a lamp. When asked why, he said he was trying to find an honest man. That’s the roots of cynicism but it got spun out to someone who questions the truth of a situation, kind-of looking for trouble. The real cynics were just people seeking truth, the words of any spiritual teachings. The words meaning changed over time. But it’s okay, we are a metal band, we need a little darkness.

JF: Dooes you daily life relate to your spiritual life?

PM: You know, it’s right in front of us. It’s not over there, not behind you, it’s right here. I feel like it’s everything that’s happening; it’s all one thing. This music we create is almost closer to the truth than all these words. It’s mysterious to think of what a musician does. You’re sculpting sound molecules, creating these vibes. It’s trippy you know.

JF: What makes this EP special?

PM: Yeah, this one is really special because it was recorded and written over a six-week period. It was the summer 2011 album. It was a very interesting year. Our whole lives were turned upside down. We started to take care of each other. There was a lot of pressure and things falling apart and so there’s a lot of life in there. It’s very concentrated. It’s probably the most honest thing we’ve done.

JF: Why did you choose Carbon-Based Anatomy for the new title of the EP?

PM: We are carbon-based creatures and it is a very human record, mounted in human-based things. So I really felt like it was a scientific way of saying this is a very Earth-based music album.

 

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Modern Spirituality Meets Modern Technology in New Revolutionary Multimedia Book, Holy Crap

Author and musician Dan Messinger leads readers onto a new path, one that welcomes the hassles and distractions of everyday life as valuable lessons for spiritual growth, and uses multimedia – including a book, music, audio meditations, and a Web community – to revolutionize spirituality.

Sonoma, California (PRWEB) November 16, 2011

Holy Crap is a revolutionary spiritual program that supports people of all faiths in using everyday hassles as opportunities for spiritual growth. With humor and stories of his own struggles as a father, husband and corporate VP, Dan Messinger both entertains and enlightens in his new multimedia book, Holy Crap: Spirituality within the Muck of Everyday Life.

In addition to Messinger’s book, Holy Crap offers a multimedia, 360° wrap-around collection of spiritual tools that work together to transform the crap of everyday hassles into spiritual growth. His Website, holycrapway.com, is becoming a community meeting place for spiritual seekers. It includes free, full-length audio streaming of his meditation~visualization CD. Messinger is also a singer, songwriter and saxophonist who provides exploding, melodious songs from the heart, with positive and spiritual lyrics, in Wide Awake: Songs from Holy Crap, an inspirational, classic-rock music CD. Recommended tracks: It’s Alright Little Bear and Everybody Needs to Feel Their Bottom.

“Modern spirituality can be enhanced by modern technology,” says Dan Messinger. Smartphones, eReaders and RSS feeds, which relay Holy Crap tools and spiritual encouragement throughout the day, offer real-time support right within the muck of everyday life. It’s like having a spiritual ally right there with you in the most challenging of times.

Dan Messinger has been transforming “crap” into the “holy” in every corner of his life for twenty-five years. He doesn’t just seek truth, he attempts to integrate universal spiritual principles into his every interaction and circumstance. His hunger for meaning led him to pursue his undergraduate and graduate degrees in Religion at Vassar and University of California at Santa Barbara respectively.

“Spiritual growth does not come easily,” says Dan Messinger. He struggles with it still, and that makes the stories he relates in Holy Crap: Spirituality within the Muck of Everyday Life that much more compelling. He includes his personal tales of being a dad to a ten-year-old son, and – with his Holy Crap soundtrack – provides poetic song lyrics which poignantly capture both the miracle of everyday life and the struggles of the human condition. “Spirituality is just within reach, and it can be a part of every day,” Messinger says. He shows how it’s done.

Ultimately, it’s Messinger’s respect for all faiths and all paths, clearly evident throughout this unique spiritual multimedia collection, that leaves the reader feeling deeply supported wherever they are on their spiritual journey.

Holy Crap: Spirituality within the Muck of Everyday Life is available on holycrapway.com, as well as on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and online retailers. Published by Lucky Bat Books, Holy Crap can be purchased in print and ebook formats. Dan Messinger’s music and mediation CD’s, Wide Awake: Songs from Holy Crap and Meditations & Visualizations from Holy Crap are available on holycrapway.com as well as on iTunes, Amazon and CDBaby.

For more information, please contact Dan Messinger at 707-477-6234 or via email at dan(at)hc-way(dot)com. Visit the Holy Crap website at http://www.holycrapway.com.

###

Dan Messinger
Holy Crap
(707) 477-6234
Email Information

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The Real Religulous: Elon explores stereotypes, spirituality

Gun-owning, anti-government Bible thumpers. Terrorists who crash planes in the name of Allah. Amoral cynics who judge religious people. The portrayal of religious groups and atheists in media, prompted a discussion at Elon University about the myths of many of these claims.

Religious studies lecturer L.D. Russell, a self-described “recovering Baptist,” assistant professor of Arabic Shereen Elgamal, a lifelong Muslim, and sociology professor and atheist Tom Arcaro participated in The Real Religulous, a panel discussion moderated by associate professor of communications Anthony Hatcher Monday.

The panel, hosted by Elon’s interfaith student group Better Together, was organized to facilitate one of the group’s priorities: bringing mutual understanding between people of different religious backgrounds.

“People finding motivation in religion to do ungodly things is certainly a huge problem and has been throughout history,” Russell said. “But I want to be careful not to lose sight of the tremendous good that has been done and motivated by religion. For every Osama bin Laden, there might be a Mother Theresa. And you shouldn’t deny that.”

Elgamal, who said she has experienced instances of discrimination for being a Muslim, shared her thoughts that most problems that stem from religion don’t come from the faith systems themselves, but rather from misguided followers.

“I would say religion is not the problem,” she said. “I think people misrepresenting or forcing religion on other people is the problem.”

The 10 years after Sept. 11, Elgamal said, have been characterized by Western public opinion of Muslims as evildoers. But when asked what Muslims can do to combat the terrorist label, she told the audience that little could be done besides having lifestyles consistent with the message of peace.

“I agree it is a perpetual stereotype,” Elgamal said. “We do the best we can and we get our points for trying. It starts with me and then I spread the word of knowledge and peace and understanding and each of us becomes an agent.”

Christians, whose stereotype in the media is commonly that of right-winged fundamentalists, Russell said, also encompass a wide range of people, beliefs and cultural tendencies.
Left–leaning Christians, Roman Catholics and Mormons, he said, which are less commonly portrayed in media than mainstream Protestants, are but a few examples of other groups who identify with Christianity.

“Certainly a healthy portion would fit the description of gun-owning and right-winged,” Russell said. “However, there is a broad spectrum. There are conservative, traditional evangelicals who by and large fit that description, but you also have centrists and modernist evangelicals who might believe some of the same things but might be much less political about those beliefs.”

Arcaro, who conducted research and initiated a national survey on atheism in 2008, said religion-scoffing, modern and historical leaders in the atheist stream are not representative of all nonbelievers.

“The perception of atheists by a lot of folks is that this is a monolithic group of people who all look like Christopher Hitchens or Richard Dawkins,” he said. “Those more vocal voices tend to paint the image of atheism for everyone, and that’s a small group of folks. There are a lot of everyday atheists out there — you wouldn’t know it, but you might be sitting next to one.”

Many atheists are grouped together with anti-theists, Arcaro said, who see religion in general as a problem. He said that was the type of stereotype he wanted to dispel.

Whether widespread understanding among religions will be established is unsure, according to Elgamal. Although some people are misguided about the reality of her faith, Elgamal said she doesn’t make it a priority to correct them, but rather to simply live out her convictions and do good to others.

“To combat evil with good, it’s a lot of work and takes a lot of time,” she said. “But I believe that positive energy multiples in certain ways, so hopefully good will prevail in the end. But when is the most difficult part of that question.”

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